Williams Legato 88-key Digital Piano Review

I just picked up this Williams legato 88-key digital piano, it’s under 200 bucks to get the digital piano and all the accessories. I was just looking to upgrade a cheap Casio keyboard for my kids. They wanted something a little more serious but I didn’t really want to spend all that much, and it’s going this kind of cheapest deal you can find for semi weighted keys and it sounds pretty good.

The keyboard comes in a big box 12 package you also get the music holder and an instruction manual, and the keyboard definitely has some good heft to it, so that seems good in the accessories spot to get something that’s awfully critical.

Williams Legato 88 key Digital Piano Review

As most seems like a lot of keyboards don’t come with this, which is really silly but you get this box the Williams essentials pack which has the power adapter so this keyboard will run off batteries.

But I think most people want this they should just give it to you but they make you get the accessories pack so you also get a probably a very cheap pair of headphones and a sustain pedal so that’s kind of the most important thing along with the stand because that’s helpful.

This 88-key piano also come with the bench which in this case holding that’s kind of nice put it out of the way when you’re not using it. You also get a learning software, so have to see what that’s all about, but essentially under 200 bucks for the legato is a kind of the best deal for a semi weighted key digital piano.

Advanced Function

Split Mode

Split Mode allows the keyboard to get divided into two sections in order that different voices may be tinkered with the left and right hands. The volume might be independently adjusted for every voice, the Split Point (the very best note played with the left-hand) might be adjusted along with the Split Voice may be changed as desired.

Voices

The Legato piano has 5 built-in voices. Each voice may be selected one at a time. They can be layered to produce two voices at the same time, or assigned to the left or right hands from the split mode.

Voices include: Piano, Electric Piano, Organ, Synth and Bass.

Demo songs

You will find 5 demo songs from the Legato piano. Each demo song shows some other voice (Piano/ Electric Piano/ Organ/ Synth/ Bass and Piano) . The demo songs could possibly be selected by pressing the REVERB and CHORUS buttons together simultaneously for five seconds. The demo starts off with the Piano. During playback, another voice could be chosen by pressing some other voice select button.

Layer Mode

In Layer mode two voices may be played simultaneously.

1. To layer two sounds, press the corresponding voices simultaneously. Both LEDs will illuminate while layered.

2. To turn Layer Mode off, select a single voice button and yet another Voice will probably be deterred.

You will find 4 function buttons around the Legato that control various functions. They’re Reverb, Chorus, Metronome and Tempo.

Reverb and Chorus Buttons

The Reverb and Chorus effects might be applied to every voice individually and will be retained even if your power is deterred. To utilize either effect, press either button. The button will light as well as the effect will likely be heard in the event the piano is played.

To change off the effect, press the button of the desired effect again and the LED light should go off.

Williams Legato 88 key Digital Piano Review

Specification

My review on this Williams legato digital piano


When I first played the Williams, I liked their cabinets of the digital pianos, and I was really impressed of their piano sound, and I was pretty impressed of the touch even though it’s not a fully weighted keys. for a semi weighted it has a heavy touch to it. so if I’m playing something fast it recognizes my every move. However, the maximum volume that you get it’s not good if you’re going to actually play with a band. One thing that I know that they were selling a lot because of the price of them is so affordable, you could get an excellent a nice huge digital console piano for under $200.

There’s some pros and cons on it, the cons is only a couple cons that I had on it.

Pros:

  • As a 88-key model the piano sound ten times better than the previous models that they had.
  • You can add course to it
  • You can take out the chords
  • Every note works perfectly it has a lot of reverb on it

Cons:

The cons number one: it didn’t have a top key felt, so when you when you press it you cannot actually hear the sound of the keys, but if I turn the keyboard down it’s a very quiet action to play, which is really cool. I always wanted to make it just a little bit more quieter.

The cons number two: This piano doesn’t have a transpose but you know what that’s perfectly okay because this puts me to the test of playing stuff in different keys that I haven’t played before which is really cool.

The cons number three: my number three complaint was basically it doesn’t have a line in for an iPad so I just have to lets you know it’s not really a complaint, because I’m playing with the amplifier and I put plug in my iPad and another channel on the amplifier which is okay. so if you’re going to buy the Williams legato this is what really convinced me make sure that they have an amplifier right next to it

The number fourth complaint which I could fix myself is at the battery pack, the batteries are not really stable in a position because it’s missing. I don’t know if have a extra battery pack over here I mean the battery cover is missing like a spongy stopper so the batteries could stay in place which I can add that myself but as in the rest of this piano it is a perfect digital.